Healthy Thanksgiving Plate

Making healthy choices during the holidays can be difficult.  Here are some tips for a healthy food choices using the plate format:

 VEGETABLES

  • Fill ½ of your plate with vegetables, such as carrots, green beans, broccoli, salad, brussel sprouts, or asparagus.
  • Avoid casseroles or dishes that have heavy creams, sauces, butter, or crusts.
  • If your table is low on vegetables, consider adding fruit to this half of your plate.  Cranberries, baked apples, and pears are good options.

GRAINS

  • Fill ¼ of your plate with starches such as stuffing and sweet potatoes.
  • Other choices for this section may include: mashed potatoes, rice pilaf, or corn pudding.
  • Skip the bread or rolls.

PROTEIN

  • Fill ¼ of your plate with lean turkey slices (approx. 3-4oz).
  • Avoid dark meat, including drumsticks.
  • Remove the skin from the turkey before eating.
  • Instead of gravy, use a fruit-based relish special kick.

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BEWARE of The Cotton Ball Diet !

There are millions of fad diets out there; but, I do have to say that “The Cotton Ball Diet” is the utmost craziest diet I have seen.  Not to mention, it’s potential danger.  The diet calls for consuming 5 cotton balls saturated in juice, lemonade, or smoothie in one sitting so you feel full.  Therefore, you will eat less and lose weight.  Please don’t attempt this diet!

For more details about this insane diet, http://abcnews.go.com/Health/dangerous-diet-trend-cotton-ball-diet/story?id=20942888&singlePage=true .

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Hummus

This ancient food, dating back to 3,000 B.C., is a new American favorite.  Hummus is the Arabic word for chickpea so a spread made from any other legume is not hummus.  Traditional hummus is a mixture of cooked chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, garlic, a dash of citrus or other acidic ingredients, and salt.  Tahini is an important part of the recipe and cannot be substitute; but, it can be omitted.  Hummus makes a very healthy snack that is high in protein and fiber.

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Here’s a simple recipe from http://mideastfood.about.com/od/appetizerssnacks/r/hummusbitahini.htm

Ingredients:

1 16 oz can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans
1/4 cup liquid from can of chickpeas
3-5 tablespoons lemon juice (depending on taste)
1 1/2 tablespoons tahini
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
Preparation:

Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can. Combine remaining ingredients in blender or food processor. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from chickpeas. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.

Place in serving bowl, and create a shallow well in the center of the hummus.

Add a small amount (1-2 tablespoons) of olive oil in the well. Garnish with parsley (optional).

Serve immediately with fresh, warm or toasted pita bread, or cover and refrigerate.

For a spicier hummus, add a sliced red chile or a dash of cayenne pepper.

Hummus can be refrigerated for up to 3 days and can be kept in the freezer for up to one month. Add a little olive oil if it appears to be too dry.

Skinny Pulled Chicken in the Crock Pot Recipe & Only 2 Ingredients

This recipe is super simple and only 2 ingredients.  Moreover, it tastes amazing.

WHAT YOU NEED:

  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast (about 4 breasts)
  • 1 bottle honey barbeque sauce

WHAT TO DO:

Place chicken breasts in crock pot and pour barbeque sauce over top.  That’s it!  Cook on low for 8 hours or on high for 4 hours.  Take a fork a shred the chicken.

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NUTRITION INFO:

  • 157 Calories
  • 1 gm fat
  • 34 mg cholesterol
  • 724 mg sodium
  • 22 gm carbohydrate
  • 14 gm protein

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Fasting 2 Days Per Week Can Actually Have Health Benefits

FAsting

Here it is!!   Fasting 2 days per week  may prevent Alzheimer’s Disease, Obesity, Cancer and Diabetes.  Fasting two or more days a week is catching on as people seek ways to avoid a range of ailments linked to obesity from dementia to cancer.  Building on promising findings in studies of mice by the U.S. National Institute of Aging, researchers are planning the first studies in humans of fasting’s potential to stave off the onset of Alzheimer’s.  That disease is just one of many in which scientists are making progress understanding how fasting may help prevent illness.

Resource:  http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01378208?term=NCT01378208&rank=1

Are You Addicted to Oreo’s?

If you think you may have an oreo addiction, it might be true.  Eating high-fat sugary foods stimulate the neurons in the pleasure center of the brain.  This is the same effect that addictive drugs have on the brain.  Please read http://www.today.com/health/addicted-oreos-you-truly-might-be-8C11399682 for more information.

Oreo